Abigail Adams Socks
Abigail Adams Socks
Abigail Adams Socks
Abigail Adams Socks
Abigail Adams Socks
Abigail Adams Socks

Abigail Adams Socks

  • National Archives Store Exclusive
  • Made in the U.S.A.
  • Toe seam
  • One size fits most (ladies up to size 12, men up to size 10.5)
  • 70% cotton, 28% polyester, 2% elastic
  • Machine wash cool, inside out, tumble dry
  • These soft pink-based crewsocks with brown accents are a delightful tribute to one of America's most influential first ladies, Abigail Adams. The comforting shade of pink forms the base of each sock, while subtle brown highlights add a touch of sophistication. The design features an image of Abigail Adams, adorned with her signature powdered wig and colonial-era dress. Her piercing eyes seem to follow you wherever you go, as if she's encouraging you to stand up for your beliefs and make a difference in the world.

    The socks also bear the National Archives branding on the foot, symbolizing the importance of preserving history and honoring the legacy of those who have shaped our nation. They are crafted from a high-quality cotton blend, ensuring both comfort and durability, perfect for those long days of touring historic sites or simply lounging at home.

    Pull on a pair of these soft pink-based crewsocks with brown accents and feel the spirit of Abigail Adams guide you through your day. Not only will they keep your feet warm and cozy, but they'll also serve as a daily reminder of the strength, intelligence, and resilience of the remarkable women who have shaped our nation.

  • To become the first female Jewish Supreme Court Justice, the unsinkable Ruth Bader Ginsburg had to overcome countless injustices. Growing up in Brooklyn in the 1930s and '40s, Ginsburg was discouraged from working by her father, who thought a woman's place was in the home. Regardless, she went to Cornell University, where men outnumbered women four to one. There, she met her husband, Martin Ginsburg, and found her calling as a lawyer. Despite discrimination against Jews, females, and working mothers, Ginsburg went on to become Columbia Law School's first tenured female professor, a judge for the US Court of Appeals, and finally, a Supreme Court Justice.

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