Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons
Confetti Crayons

Confetti Crayons

  • Set of 12
  • Sharpened on both ends
  • Non toxic
  • Ages: 3 and up
  • Hexagonally shaped for little hands that are still developing fine motor skills, these vibrant crayons are like a party in a crayon box! Sharpened on both ends, the tips can be used for small details and the sides of the crayon can be used for coloring in large areas. These unique crayons feature playful color combinations that will blend into an array of tones as you color.

  • During the depths of the Great Depression of the 1930s and into the early years of World War II, the Federal government supported the arts in unprecedented ways. Between 1933 and 1943, federal tax dollars employed artists, musicians, actors, writers, photographers, and dancers. Never before or since has our government so extensively sponsored the arts.

    The New Deal arts projects provided work for jobless artists, and also had a larger mission: to promote American art and culture and to give more Americans access to what President Franklin Roosevelt described as "an abundant life." The projects saved thousands of artists from poverty and despair and enabled Americans all across the country to see an original painting for the first time, attend their first professional live theater, or take their first music or drawing class.

    The arts projects also sparked controversy. Some politicians believed them to be wasteful propaganda and wanted them ended; others wanted them expanded. Such controversy, along with the United States' entry into World War II, eventually killed the projects. Much of what they fashioned has survived through the efforts of museums, libraries, and archives, including the National Archives and Records Administration. They are examples of an extraordinary burst of American creativity that occurred during a time of tremendous change and trial.