I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game
I Never Forget a Face Memory Game

I Never Forget a Face Memory Game

  • 24 pairs of cards
  • Recycled grayboard
  • 2 1/4 inches square
  • Vegetable-based ink
  • Ages 5 and up
  • This cheery, award-winning game matches faces to countries. Twenty-four pairs of illustrated cards depict the happy faces of children from all over the world and make for a fun and educational memory game. Perfectly sized for little hands, the colorful cards are constructed from sturdy cardboard. At times challenging, the game helps sharpen recognition and memory skills. The back of the game box shows which country each child is from. This is fun for all the family.

  • In the early 20th century, it was common for children, some as young as four, to work in America’s factories, mines, fields, canneries, and tenement sweatshops. In 1910, children under the age of 15 made up 18.4 percent of the nation’s workforce. Outraged reformers began a campaign to end child labor in the United States. By 1915, several states had passed child labor laws. Congress twice enacted legislation that the Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional. A constitutional amendment restricting child labor passed Congress in 1924, but the necessary number of states failed to approve the amendment. In 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act was passed, prohibiting most children under age 16 from working in industry. Agricultural and domestic labor were excluded.

    More information about child labor can be found within records of rights, a National Archives permanent exhibit, following the history of the ongoing struggle of Americans to define, attain, and protect their rights.