Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament
Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament

Vintage World Traveler Bundle Set 2: Note Cards and Ornament

  • Ornaments: 3 1/2 inches diameter
  • Brass finials and rings
  • With a vintage world theme, this set makes a terrific gift. A collection of two globe ornaments and a note card set, they are perfect for the experienced traveler or for someone who dreams of exploring.

  • The National Archives holds passport applications dating from October 1795 to March 1925, while the Department of State holds applications from April 1925 to the present. The department has issued passports to American citizens traveling abroad since 1789, but did not have the sole authority to do so until 1856.

    Foreign travel in the 19th century was not unusual. Overseas travelers included businessmen, the middle class, and naturalized American citizens who returned to their homelands to visit relatives. Although 95 percent of mid-19th-century passport applicants were men, many women also traveled overseas. If an applicant was to be accompanied by his wife, children, servants, or other females under his protection, their names, ages, and relationship to the applicant were stated on the passport application. One passport was then issued to cover the whole group. Likewise, when children traveled abroad solely with their mother, their names and ages were indicated on the mother's passport application. Passport applications by women in their own names became more frequent in the latter part of the 19th century, and by 1923, women constituted over 40 percent of passport applicants.