Juneteenth Bandana
Juneteenth Bandana
Juneteenth Bandana
Juneteenth Bandana
Juneteenth Bandana

Juneteenth Bandana

  • Hand made and screen printed in the U.S.A.
  • 100% cotton
  • 22 X 22 inches
  • Cold water wash by hand or gentle cycle in washing machine: the fabric will soften with use and washing
  • A wonderful piece that was designed in Washington, D.C., this cotton bandana is intended by the artist and creator to be a conversation with the wearer about identity, culture and personal mythology. Inspired by the Liberty coin, this vibrant, handmade work is a design that symbolizes hope. It shows how deeply Black people are a part of the fabric of America, and points to how their celebrations are part of the way they continue to unapologetically push forward.

  • On June 19, 1865, two and a half years after President Abraham Lincoln’s historic Emancipation Proclamation, U.S. Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger issued General Order No. 3, which informed the people of Texas that all enslaved people were now free. Granger commanded the Headquarters District of Texas, and his troops had arrived in Galveston the previous day.

    This day has come to be known as Juneteenth, a combination of June and 19th. It is also called Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, and it is the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

    The official handwritten record of General Order No. 3, is preserved at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

    General Order No. 3 states: 

    “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.”