Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints
Set of 4 Docu-Mints

Set of 4 Docu-Mints

  • National Archives Store Exclusive
  • Candy manufactured in the U.S.A.
  • Set of four
  • 1 ⅗ X 2 ¾ X ½ inches
  • These fun tins of candy are a great size for stashing into a purse, a desk drawer or a care package. With four different designs on their sliding lids, and spearmint, lemon, sour fruit and cinnamon candy flavors inside, there is bound to be something for everyone. 

  • Established in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the National Archives' major holdings date back to 1775. They capture the sweep of the past: slave ship manifests and the Emancipation Proclamation; captured German records and the Japanese surrender documents from World War II; journals of polar expeditions and photographs of Dust Bowl farmers; Indian treaties making transitory promises; and a richly bound document bearing the bold signature "Bonaparte"—the Louisiana Purchase Treaty that doubled the territory of the young republic.

    The National Archives keeps only those Federal records that are judged to have continuing value—about 2 to 5 percent of those generated in any given year. By now, they add up to a formidable number, diverse in form as well as in content. There are approximately 10 billion pages of textual records; 12 million maps, charts, and architectural and engineering drawings; 25 million still photographs and graphics; 24 million aerial photographs; 300,000 reels of motion picture film; 400,000 video and sound recordings; and 133 terabytes of electronic data. All these materials are preserved because they are important to the workings of government, have long-term research worth, or provide information of value to citizens.