Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters
Silence Dogood Letters

Silence Dogood Letters

  • 11 X 17 inches
  • Heavy-weight paper, uniquely aged by hand
  • Benjamin Franklin used the pen name Mrs. Silence Dogood so he could get his work published in the New England Courant, a paper published by his brother, James Franklin.

    This set of nine letters is printed on heavy-weight paper and aged by hand, lending them an antique look. Featured in the National Treasure movie, the Silence Dogood letters were used by Benjamin Franklin gates to break an Ottendorf cipher!

  • On June 11, 1776, the second Continental Congress chose a committee of five delegates to "prepare a declaration of independency." Serving along with Franklin were Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston. Franklin edited Jefferson's initial draft, notably suggesting the phrase "We hold these truths to be self-evident." Jefferson's original had described these truths as "sacred and undeniable." This draft to the Continental Congress, along with many other Franklin letters and documents, is preserved and protected in the National Archives.